A Year of Living Seasonally · Living the Good Life · Parenting

What is seasonal food?

As some of you may have read here before, I have been undertaking a project which I’m calling A Year of Living Seasonally. It occurs to me typing this that I haven’t written much on it in the last couple of months – is that possibly something to do with the quietness and hibernation-type elements of winter? Maybe. Living seasonally – for me anyway – means being more aware of the seasons , more aware of the changes that each new season brings and one element of that which interests me is food. I love to cook and to try out new recipes, I love to eat, and I will happily read a good cookbook in the same way that I would read a novel. Or any half decent book come to that.

But back to food. Food, glorious food! I do most of the cooking and food shopping in our house and try to ensure we eat a range of different foods. We also grow vegetables and fruit and this year I am determined to plan our eating more around what we can grow for ourselves. We don’t have any animals (yet!). I am fairly choosy about the food I buy on the whole – 90% of the meat we eat comes from our local butcher’s shop who not only sell meat, they also have their own abattoir and as they are also farmers, produce some of the meat themselves. I buy very little heavily processed food, yes on occasion we do have takeaways, and yes on the odd occasion we eat with our daughter in fast food outlets (I cannot bring myself to term them restaurants), but overall we try at the very least to be aware of what we are eating. I am hoping to get hold of Joanna Blythman’s new book Swallow This, soon which may well be an eye opener for me.

So tying all of this into my Year of Living Seasonally project, I began to wonder what is seasonal food anyway? I would understand it to be food that is naturally ready for eating at any specific time. In terms of fruit and vegetables, it is those which have finished growing and are ready for harvesting. With regard to meat it is that which has grown to the stage at which those people who eat meat consider it ready to eat. Pulses, nuts, legumes, same as fruit and veg I would have thought. I have a feeling this year of living seasonally might change my understanding of what is seasonal food and might see me trying out some new foods.

I’ve been doing a bit of a declutter of late and I realised I have stacks of cookery magazines, many of which I’ve never even read. So this morning I decided to start looking at them. I started with Country Kitchen, a British based magazine. I freely admit I was seduced by the title and the tagline which reads “Cooking with traditional, seasonal and fresh food.” It’s interesting to realise that I’ve been thinking along these lines for years but have never done anything much about it. Country Kitchen magazine (I’m not sure if it is still in publication) listed the foods that were in season (presumably in Britain) every month. As I live in Ireland, the seasons are much the same as those in Britain so I’m going to take these as a starting point. I compiled this into a list of my own. (I love lists) Some of it was quite fascinating. To take this month – March – as an example, they say the meat currently in season is rabbit, spring lamb and venison. You won’t get rabbit or venison in any shop in my town (a small town I grant you) and round here unless you shoot or know someone who does, you’ll be hard pushed to get them. On to fish. Wild salmon, oysters, mussels, sea trout, razor clams, scallops and elvers. How easy are these to get hold of for most people? With the exception of the sea trout they are not easy for me that’s for sure. Fruit? They say apples, pears, forced rhubarb are all seasonal. Yes, I’d agree on the rhubarb, although I’d question if forced rhubarb is really adhering to having in its natural season. We have rhubarb in the garden and this year’s new leaves are just beginning to emerge. We don’t force it, never have. Apples and pears? Well if they are stored well from last year then I suppose they could be called seasonal. And what vegetables are supposed to be seasonal this month according to the magazine? Beetroot, purple sprouting broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, chard, chicory, endive, garlic, kale, leek, lettuce, nettle, onion, scallion (spring onion), parsnip, potato, radish, seakale, sorrel, spinach,squash, turnip. Hmmm. I might not be thinking about seasonality the right way. We have grown many of these in our garden and none would be harvested around now. Garlic and onions yes we have had our own supply of those harvested the previous autumn and still using in spring (not this year though, last year’s onions and garlic didn’t do so well)

So is something considered seasonal if is still available from storage? That I am not sure about. I just discovered a lovely website Eat the Seasons which looks at all of this in more detail, and gives recipes too. While I am clearly still learning about what exactly constitutes seasonal food, I can make sure that I buy food produced and grown as locally as possible. I will not be buying strawberries in March, or asparagus in April, not unless the Irish seasons change dramatically!

A Year of Living Seasonally · food · Ritual food

Imbolc – the coming of spring

Today is 1st February, and traditionally in Ireland this was considered to be the first day of Spring. It falls midway between the winter solstice (21st Dec) and the spring equinox (21st Mar). It marks the turning of the season and is the feast day of Brigid, whether you see her as a goddess, an aspect of the Mother Goddess or the Christian saint. There is a lot I could – and will – write about Imbolc and what it means to me, but that’s for another post.

Imbolc and the arrival of spring signal renewal, rejuvenation, a fresh start. I love watching for the first spring flowers. The spring bulbs are peeping through all over the garden, such vibrant shades of green spring bulbs at imbolc

I haven’t heard of any ritual foods or dishes associated with Imbolc, but Brigid in her Christian form is the patroness of sheep, and an alternative name for the day, Óimelc, is thought to denote the time of ewes coming into milk. The new lambs are always a welcome and lively sight in spring too. This feels like a cleansing time of year – hence the spring clean? – and when thinking about Imbolc this morning I decided to make some lemon curd. Lemon is one of my favourite flavours and scents and the clean tang of lemon appealed to me in keeping with freshness. So after a couple of hours in the kitchen I came up with some lemon and some orange curd. You can see the lemon here. The orange didn’t set quite so well but still tasted great! I made an orange sponge cake filled with it. lemon curd

For dinner I settled on a Darina Allen recipe, Winter Beef Stew – well having a winter meal and a spring inspired dessert seemed as good a way as any other to mark this turning of the season. There is still some snow on the ground, and the gritter went by earlier, but it is spring. Its time to move out of the reflective, restorative period of winter and move into the renewal, rebirth of spring.

A Year of Living Seasonally

How is it nearly February already?

I know I have been talking about my Year of Living Seasonally on here from time to time but seriously, how the hell is it nearly February already?  It seems like only a few days ago since my husband went back to work and our daughter back to school – more like 3 weeks ago.  I was pondering this while gazing out at the falling snow earlier, mug of tea firmly clasped in hand.  This January (2015 in case anyone’s reading this in years to come) has been a bit of an mixed bag weather wise.  Its been cold, we’ve had some snow (not much really), some very strong winds and now its gorgeously sunny and bracing out there.  But it hasn’t felt like a typical January to me.  Is that because I am trying to slow down and notice things more?  If that’s the case then why has the end of the month snuck up on me?   Time to take stock I think.

So what did I do in January?  Well, I’ve been working on a new course to teach, picked up another rotten cold which I then shared with everyone else (why should I suffer alone??), didn’t make any New Year resolutions (not my thing – see here), got more into knitting, read a few books…… yeah it was a good enough month all told.  But it seems to have just slipped by me in some ways.  Aha!  That’s the slowing down and taking time thing isn’t it?  This Year of Living Seasonally lark must be starting to kick in.  January is a cold month, evenings still dark, weather can be dodgy, so its a good time to chill and hibernate a bit.  THAT’S what I’ve been doing – I just didn’t realise it.

Imbolc is just around the corner.  I feel its time to step up a gear.

A Year of Living Seasonally · Parenting

Mindfulness

Its become something of a buzz word or term over the last couple of years hasn’t it? Mindfulness. Being mindful. Living mindfully. I kind of got the concept but never really thought about it any more than that. At least not consciously. Then last year when I began my Year of Living Seasonally project and started thinking about what that meant for me, I realised that some of it anyway was about mindfulness. Or living in the moment. And that is something I have never been very good at. My blog is titled Musings and Chatterings of a busy mind for a reason – I find it incredibly hard to switch my mind off and just BE. I’m always either looking back and thinking about the past (that’s the historian in me) or making plans, lists and starting projects for the future. As I am now firmly in my middle age (and proud of it) I can look back over probably 30 years of being that way and understand why at times my brain almost aches with tiredness. So its time to slow down – or at least stop from time to time and just be.

Of course life doesn’t always go according to plan and I have caught myself lapsing into old habits over the last few weeks. This weekend (I’m writing this on a Sunday night), the three of us have had a rotten cold. Its just a cold, nothing serious, but we all know how miserable a cold can make you feel. Its especially hard on Fionnuala who is unable to understand why she feels rotten and is equally unable to communicate exactly what she wants or needs. Add to that a mother who has never been a good patient and who has very little innate patience and you can imagine there’s been a few tetchy moments in this house today! Thankfully my husband remains a beacon of levelheadedness and calm and separates us when we are driving each other mad. I have felt bad today for occasionally being a bit short with our little girl and have been trying to remind myself to stop and breathe deeply before I say something. (It hasn’t always worked)

Instead of beating myself up over it, I thought about it for a while and decided this was a good opportunity to practise a bit of mindfulness. So when a fellow blogger, Aisling from Babysteps posted about doing a linky on mindfulness, it seemed like the universe was telling me something! So – mindfulness. I admit I find it hard to practise at times. Having a child with special needs has made me look at the world in a different way that’s for sure, and yes it does make me slow down. A lot of things now have to be done at Fionnuala’s pace. But I have to force myself at times to just be rather than always be doing. One thing that I find works is to wander around our garden and just look, listen, smell and observe. The last couple of days have been rather inclement to say the least, but I did manage to get outside for a while earlier and amongst the snow, I found these Snowdrops!

Spring is coming, its time to stop and breathe and just be. Thanks Aisling for the timely reminder! You can see her post on this here

Parenting

Oops I didn’t do it – again

No I swear I am not getting into a habit of recycling song titles to use as blog post titles apologies to the Proclaimers but this line came up in a conversation I was having with friends earlier. (Actually on that point, is a multi-person message on Facebook a conversation??) Anyway, we were chatting about Hallowe’en outfits for children. I hadn’t bought one for herself yet – to be honest I wasn’t even sure I was going to as we don’t do trick or treating, its just not safe on our road – but then got a message home from school yesterday to say the children can wear their Hallowe’en outfits in tomorrow as they are having a party. Shite. Cue panicky rummaging through her clothes – nada that is even vaguely Hallowe’en-esque. Our town is small (and I like it that way) but it means not a great selection of outfits. Anyway we have purchased two out of which I will attempt tonight to cobble one.

And that reminded me that every year of my daughter’s life I have decided to make her a Hallowe’en outfit. And every spring I’ve had the best intentions to do something with eggs and chicks (fake ones). And in the run up to Christmas I always think how lovely it would be to make an Advent calendar for her. And I haven’t done any of them yet. But I’m not beating myself up over it, I’ve realised I get nearly as much enjoyment out of thinking about these projects and looking up creative ideas as I would out of actually doing them and that’s got to be good, right?

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Back again

Have been feeling very snowed under of late with various things and so have been neglecting the things that give me the most pleasure. And I include my blog in that as it is a little bit of time for me and no-one else 🙂 So what’s been happening?

Well we have a new government in Ireland, a Fine Gael/Labour coalition, I’m not madly enthused by it, I feel that FG and Fianna Fáil are really just two sides of the one coin. I have a lot of time for the Labour Party but let’s just wait and see how things pan out.

The weather is as changeable as my mood, we had a glorious week last week, sunny bright brilliantly clear days. I even managed to get the grass on the upper garden cut last Saturday for the first time this year. The primroses are in bud and hopefully that area of the garden will be full of their buttermilk and cream gorgeousness in a few weeks. Daffodils are buddng everywhere, crocuses are starting to pass over, we didn’t have as many bloom this year as previous years. The forsythia is in full colour, a vibrant yellow which certainly brightens up a dismal damp March day such as we are having today. The latter half of this week has been very miserable – lots of rain, hailstones yesterday and so cold. The skies are a desolate pale grey and feel rather like a vile scratchy blanket that has been forced around us but which offers neither comfort nor warmth.
Am hoping for the sun to re-emerge, this incessant bleakness does nothing for my disposition.

Yet I can still hear the birds chirping and tweeting away – I can’t identify them by their song but I would love to be able to.

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A new spring…… maybe?

Our garden is beginning to show the first tentative signs of spring.  The snowdrops are shyly peeping out from underneath their green hoods, the resilient daffodils are pushing their way through the cold sodden earth,  the seasons are on the change again with Spring starting to wake up and assert itself over the land.

The garden is still very much a wilderness in a lot of ways but I am hoping  – like Spring – to assert my authority over this patch of the planet I call home.  (But I’m aiming for a benevolent dictatorship :))Daffodil bulbs rejuvenating in our front garden

Spring bulbs have always inspired me, given me hope and stopped me in my tracks to admire and just be.  Not something I do often enough.

But this spring – and its still officially winter in Ireland anyway but more of that another time 😉  – I feel more invigorated by the emergence of the spring bulbs than ever.  Maybe its to do with turning 40 in April (yes, I’m a spring baby :)or maybe its to do with the long overdue announcement yesterday by what passes for our government that we are to have the general election on March 11.  AT LAST! It feels as if maybe, just maybe, Ireland will begin to emerge from the years of Fianna Fáil misrule, from the years of parish-pump politics and gombeenism, and finally, finally become a happier, healthier, better place to be.  Like the spring bulbs, we are surrounded by dead wood, by overgrowth and by decay.  But we are still alive and we are emerging again.