Parenting · Politics · Special Needs

Is this early enough for you Taoiseach?

Good morning Taoiseach, its a few minutes after 9 am and its an average week day in our house which means that I’ve been up since 6.30 am.  I’m not sure if I’m the kind of person you had in mind when you said during your campaign to become leader of Fine Gael that you wanted to lead a party for people who get up early in the morning but here’s what I did this morning after I got up early.  (Well, 6.30 am is early as far as I’m concerned)

So the alarm went off and up I got, gathered my clothes and crept downstairs clutching the video monitor that sits by our bed.  We have a video monitor because our 10 year daughter has epilepsy and sometimes – thankfully not often – has seizures during the night.  You’re a medical doctor, so you should have some idea of how scary epilepsy can be.

You see Dr Varadkar, that little person is why I get up at 6.30 am on weekdays.  She has significant physical and intellectual disabilities and she attends special school.  We live in the north of the constituency of Meath West and our daughter has to travel to Navan in the middle of that constituency to go to school.  I’m talking in terms of constituency rather than counties or towns because I get the feeling that like most politicians you are more interested in votes than voters.  Her school bus collects her here at home at 7.45 am and then travels around collecting other pupils for the two special schools in Navan before she gets to school a little after 9 am – about the same time I started writing this post to you.  The journey door to door is 26 miles which should only take around 35 minutes but because we choose to send her on the bus it takes 1 hour and 15 minutes.  She’s only 10 and she’s been doing this since she was 5.  You might wonder why don’t I drive her in?  Yes, I could.  But Navan is already choked with traffic in the mornings and if I and the approximately 70 other parents whose children attend her school and travel in by bus all drove our children to school, can you imagine the chaos?  Never mind the extra traffic pollution.

But I digress, sorry for that Mr Varadkar but like every other carer my mind is constantly running trying to keep on top of everything.  Appointments, therapy sessions, equipment, etc etc etc.  Where was I?  Oh yes, what I did after I got up at 6.30 am.  Well I came downstairs, took a load of washing out of the machine and put another one on so it would be finished before the cheaper night rate electricity finished.  Every cent counts.  Stuck the first one in the dryer because it was raining here.  Then prepared some food for my daughter to take to school because she was quite ill earlier this year and her appetite is still not great so sometimes she won’t eat the dinner she gets at school.    Got her breakfast ready and swallowed down a quick bowl of cereal myself before heading back upstairs to waken her at 7 am.  She’s only 10 and she needs her sleep so that’s why I don’t get her up earlier.

I was tired last night so I had forgotten to leave her school uniform ready on the chair in her bedroom.  It only takes a minute to get it out of the chest of drawers but every second counts here in the mornings.  So grab the clean (at least I managed that bit!) uniform and wake her up.  She’s very wobbly first thing in the morning because her neurological condition (apart from the epilepsy) affects her balance and its especially bad when she wakes.  So while she’s waking up and starting to chat to me I leave her lying on the bed, take off her pyjamas, change her nappy and put on her trousers, socks, DAFO’s (splints for her feet) and shoes.  Then I help her sit up and change her vest then put her polo shirt and sweatshirt on.  Yay, she’s dressed and its only 7.15 am.  Then lift her from the bed and carry her downstairs.  She can get downstairs on her bum with help but she’s too wobbly first thing to do this, so I carry her.  By the way I’m only 5ft 2.

Into the kitchen and put her into the special chair we bought for her so she can sit comfortably at the table and eat with us.  Her breakfast is ready but first she has to have the two epilepsy medications she has in the morning.  She doesn’t really like taking them but she is a good kid and she swallows them without complaint.  She tucks into her breakfast.  While she’s eating I write a note to her teacher in her communication book because she only has about 70 words and a few phrases, none of which are expressive language, so this is how the teacher and I let each other know anything that’s going on with her and what she did at school each day.  She can’t tell me herself you see.

Its now about 7.30 and while she’s still eating – she’s a slow eater – I gather hair band, brush, hairslides, toothpaste, toothbrush, flannel and get ready to spruce her up.  She’s not able to do anything of this for herself but it all has to be done.  Like most 10 year olds she’s not keen on face and hand washing but we get through it with minimal grumbling.  All the while I’m chatting to her using repetitive phrases and words about school and the people she will see there as this is a big part of how she learns.  So there’s a bit of speech and language therapy thrown in early for good measure.

7.43 and the bus isn’t here yet – phew I’m ahead – help her walk to her wheelchair and climb into it.  Put her coat on, make sure she has everything in her schoolbag for the day and then the bus pulls up.  Grab a marker pen and a piece of paper that she likes to hold in her little hands while travelling for 1 hour 15 minutes to school.  Wheel her out to the  bus, have a quick word with the bus escort so they know what kind of form she’s in today.  Kiss my most precious girl goodbye and wave her off.  Its 7.48 and I’ve been up for over an hour.

Back in the house grab my phone, headphones, rain jacket, hi-vis vest and key and head out the door for a 5km walk.  I don’t especially enjoy it so I listen to podcasts on my way round to alleviate the monotony.  I need to take regular exercise because I’m overweight (many carers tend to be, we comfort eat you see) and my back isn’t great from lifting my daughter over the years.  I can’t afford to join a gym and walking is free.  Maybe one day I’ll get fit enough to join you for a 5km jog in the Park?

While I’m pounding the paths around Oldcastle I’m thinking about a tweet you posted a couple of days ago.  You see, that comment about people who get up early annoyed me. Actually more than that, it felt insulting to people like me who have to get up early to do the unpaid, unappreciated, unvalued work of being a carer.  I’ve tweeted about it a few times but when you put something like this up it really feels like you are just taking the piss not to put too fine a point on it.

People who get up early

 

 

Special thanks to @kloczbyjos in Glanmire for this thoughtful gift. New small craft business supported by Local Enterprise Office pic.twitter.com/JcDE2eALXj

I’m not sure if you were being facetious or if the people in Glanmire were but its clear to me and other carers like me that this State, of which you are Taoiseach, that our WORK (and it is work) is not taken seriously.

I’m up since 6.30 am Leo.  I’m tired already and its only 10.15.  Its a mental tiredness that comes from being a carer, from the never ending round of appointments, therapies, from wondering if she’s ok at school today, if she’s had any absence seizures.  It comes from fighting for equipment, for school transport, for better services generally, from trying to help other parents who aren’t as far into this life as we are.  It comes from knowing that this will not stop.  It comes from knowing that the Irish State of which I am a proud citizen does not care about carers. And that’s a very hard place to be.

What time did you get up today Taoiseach?

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2016 Reading Challenge · Books · Politics

2016 Reading Challenge – Book Four

So for my fourth book of the Modern Mrs Darcy Reading Challenge, I selected the category “a book you have been meaning to read”. My choice was Harry’s Last Stand by Harry Leslie Smith. I’d been looking for this for a while and then my husband got it for me late last year. I wanted to really concentrate on it when I read it so it got put off until April of this year. It was well worth the wait.

Its one of the most passionate, angry, heartfelt books I have read in a very long time. In some places it reads like a rant for which Harry Smith has been criticised in some reviews. I disagree. Yes, there are some passages of the book that come across as ranting but I don’t see that as a fault in this case. Harry is a World War Two veteran and one of the dwindling number of people who clearly remember life during the Great Depression. He remembers – and describes vividly – the appalling poverty and deprivation that was the norm of everyday life for far too many people in Britain in the 1920’s and 1930’s. He is rightly angry at how his family – and countless others – suffered and he doesn’t pull any punches in describing what they went through. His descriptions of the life and death of his sister Marion are simply heartbreaking.Harry's Last Stand

Harry goes on to describe the war years and how new opportunities opened up for him. You can hear real joy when he details the impact that free education and the birth of the NHS (National Health Service) had on the lives of the people of Britain. And you find yourself hoping that all is going to be well. But this is the point where Harry’s anger intensifies as he analyses and agonises over how this is all being dismantled and how he can see the same mistakes and wrongs being repeated in new generations of leaders and how he can see the damage this will do to people.

This is not a gentle read but it is gripping. If – like me – you remember Thatcher’s Britain and can see the same happening again under David Cameron, you will find this book pulling at your heart and hopefully your conscience. If you were born after that time you will find much in this that is thought-provoking. If you are old enough to remember the 1950’s and 1960’s, you will in all likelihood read this and weep. But read it you must.

2016 Reading Challenge · Books

2016 Reading Challenge – Book Three started and finished!!

OOPS!!! Well March kind of ran away with me here, between trying to finish a paper, the Easter 1916 commemorations and my daughter’s school holidays, the month seemed to just vanish. It only occurred to me on 31 March that I hadn’t read a book for the Modern Mrs Darcy Reading Challenge in March. As there are 12 categories in the challenge, I was working on doing one of them each month. I hadn’t even selected a category for March, let alone a book to meet it. I was in our local library with my daughter on said 31 March when this hit me. I know it wouldn’t have mattered if I hadn’t done the challenge in March but I’d made up my mind to do it that way.

A quick hunt on via the iPhone showed me that one category was ‘A book you can read in a day’. Hmmm. It was the last day of March and I was in the library, surely I’d find something I could read and finish before midnight?? Well, dear reader I did. A book by Emma Hannigan caught my eye – the Summer Guest. The Summer Guest I had never read any of Emma Hannigan’s books before, but have followed her story through Irish media. You can read about her here I’ve seen her on various TV programmes and often said to myself that I really must read one of her books one day……

And I did read it all before midnight. I liked most of the characters involved and also liked how one of the main female leads (Lexi) was portrayed at times in a way that made me wonder if she was always as nice as she initially seemed. (She is by the way, but I thought the doubting elements and the question of how others perceive us was really well done). The story moves along quickly enough and there were no characters in it that I didn’t get a feeling about. I don’t enjoy a book where I couldn’t care one way or another about the characters. Hannigan touched on a few interesting themes and ideas that I thought could have been developed a bit more but that would have probably taken the story in a different direction. The ending is both happy and sad, and let’s face it, that’s life!

Overall, yes I enjoyed it, I’d read more of hers, particularly on those occasions when I have an uninterrupted hour to sit with a cuppa and something nice and read a book that’s enjoyable and thoughtful but not too heavy.

2016 Reading Challenge · Books

2016 Reading Challenge book two – Finished!

My second book for the Modern Mrs Darcy Reading Challenge was From Beirut to Jerusalem by Swee Chai Ang. From Beirut to Jerusalem This came under the category of ‘a book chosen for you by your spouse, partner, child or BFF’. My husband selected this one for me, having read it himself a number of years ago.

It is one of the hardest books I have ever read. Not intellectually, not in the style of writing (which is very accessible), but emotionally it was so so hard. I normally whizz through books and a book of this size (302 pages) written in plain, straightforward language I would usually expect to get through in a few days. This was so difficult to read that I could only manage a chapter at a time.

I knew a little – a very little – about the conflict in Israel/OPT and the wider Middle East. I had heard of the Sabra and Shatila massacres in 1982. I knew that Lebanon had for years, decades maybe, been pulled into and suffered from, conflicts affecting their neighbours. I did not know just how truly horrific it was. Probably still is. Dr Swee writes in a very unsparing way about the numbers of dead following the Sabra and Shatila massacres. She talks of – and indeed includes a picture of – piled up in alleyways. As an orthopaedic surgeon, she describes the horrendous injuries – and their long term implications – suffered by young and old alike.

I could go on but it is better to read it for yourself, to bear witness. One thing I learnt from the book is that as a result of her time in Lebanon, she helped to start up the charity Medical Aid for Palestinians which warmed my heart as a couple of years ago, a local event I helped to organise raised money for that charity amongst others.

This book is not an easy read. But I think that makes it all the more important. Reading about events of thirty years ago and then watching the news and seeing what is happening in Syria, in the wider Middle East, seeing how many refugees have been forced into an already overcrowded Lebanon, seeing the sheer chaos and agony that people are going through on the borders of a greedy bloated Europe, meant that this book resonated with me all the more. It is one of the few books I can truly say has had a profound impact on me.

Read it. And then read more. Watch the news. Inform yourself. Bear witness. It is the very least any of us can do.

2016 Reading Challenge · Books

2016 Reading challenge – book two

February has rolled around and its blowing a gale out there this morning. My second book as part of the Modern Mrs Darcy reading challenge is one chosen for me by my husband. He has selected Dr. Swee Chai Ang’s From Beirut to Jerusalem, the account of an orthopaedic surgeon who volunteered to help civilians in Beirut in the early 1980’s. From Beirut to Jerusalem He chose this because “it was the first book I read about Lebanon after serving there and it started me reading more and more about the Middle East.” I should explain that my husband did two tours of duty with UNIFIL while a member of the Irish Defence Forces and his time there made a lasting impression on him.

Its non fiction, history, politics, a combination which I probably read more frequently than anything else, but I have never read anything about Lebanon or the wider Middle East conflict. So let’s see what I think of this one. Happy reading!

2016 Reading Challenge · Books · Uncategorized

2016 Reading Challenge book one – Finished!

As you might have seen in a previous post I’m taking part in a reading challenge this year. To those of you who know me well, the challenge might have been not to read any books this year but let’s face it, that’s never going to happen! I heard about this challenge from a fellow blogger over at Pretty Purple Polka Dots and its been interesting seeing what others are reading.

There are 12 categories of books to read over the year, you can get all the details at Modern Mrs Darcy’s page. For my first book I selected Amy Tan’s Saving Fish From Drowning, which came under the category of ‘A book you own but have never read’. I bought it in a charity shop ages ago and then it sat on one of our bookshelves. On with the review…… well I wasn’t bowled over by it. Amy TanI had read two of Tan’s books previously, The Bonesetter’s Daughter and The Joy Luck Club and found them both excellent. Heartrending in places, dealing with issues that resonated in my own life and most importantly for me, had characters I was interested in. So I had fairly high hopes for Saving Fish From Drowning. They weren’t met, now don’t get me wrong, I didn’t hate the book and would go so far as to say I liked it but I’m not mad about it.

I found that after about a third of the book I was struggling to keep going. If I hadn’t been doing this reading challenge I doubt I would have made myself continue. I am glad I did because the middle section of the book (well up to the last three or four chapters really) was much better. I never warmed to any of the characters, but neither did I take against them. I couldn’t summon up huge interest in any of them and I do wonder if having so many characters in the main story of the book (about a group of American tourists who get lost in Burma/Myanmar) made it hard to fully develop any of them. Tan’s descriptions and writing are as strong as ever but the plot never grabbed me. Would I recommend it? It wouldn’t be the top of my list of recommendations but I wouldn’t advise against reading it either.

Book one of the 2016 reading challenge down, eleven more to go. This one is going in the charity shop bag, I wouldn’t be interested in reading it again and this way two charities will benefit a little bit from it! Plus its gone from the overfull bookshelves which is a good thing too. Book two – well one of the categories is ‘a book chosen for you by your spouse, partner, sibling, child, or BFF’. I’m going to get my husband to select one for me before Mon (1st Feb). Our tastes overlap somewhat but not completely and I have no idea what he is going to choose for me! That’s part of the fun of the challenge I guess – and so far its made me finish a book I would likely have discarded otherwise. Onwards!

2016 Reading Challenge · Books

2016 Reading Challenge book one

I love books, I love reading, I can happily spend hours in a library, so when I saw the Modern Mrs Darcy challenge I decided to give it a go. The idea is you read 12 books over the year, each from a different category. I’m starting with the category “a book you own but have never read” (of which there are MANY in our house) and have chosen Amy Tan’s Saving Fish From Drowning which I picked up in a charity shop at least a year ago. It could well be longer. I’ve read two of Tan’s books, The Joy Luck Club and The Bonesetter’s Daughter and enjoyed them both very much, so hopefully this will be as good. One of the other categories is “a book chosen for you by your spouse, partner, sibling, child or BFF” so I’ve asked my husband to select one for me. No news on that front yet and I have no idea what he’ll choose. We both love to read but our tastes don’t entirely overlap. Anyway, I’ll start with this one Amy Tan and see how I get on. If nothing else I can take the book off the shelf (and make room for another hee hee!!)

Books · food · Linky

Love Your Cookbooks: Nigella Lawson’s Tarragon Chicken

This post was inspired by the lovely Elizabeth over at Life on Hushabye Farm whose blog I adore.  She has been running a cookbook linky (a linky to the uninitiated is where bloggers write posts on a theme and link them up), called Love Your Cookbooks.  Like Elizabeth I am a demon for buying cookbooks, well books in general really, but I’m not always great at then actually cooking anything from them.  So the idea was that anyone who wanted to take part would choose a recipe from one of their cookbooks, cook it and report back.  So here goes.

Nigella's book on my kitchen table
Nigella’s book on my kitchen table

I chose Tarragon Chicken from Nigella Lawson’s Kitchen.  I love Nigella’s books and have been known to sit and read them like others would a novel.  But I can’t watch her on TV she drives me mad.  I’ve cooked quite a lot from Feast which is probably my favourite of hers, and also from How To Be A Domestic Goddess, but until yesterday hadn’t tried anything from Kitchen.  We eat chicken more than any other meat in this house, and this recipe seemed quick and easy.   And after a long few days with our little girl unwell, that was my primary consideration!

Tarragon chicken recipe

This was just for the two of us, although herself is on the mend her appetite is not back yet.  It was so easy!  There is very little prep, just chopping some scallions and tarragon (both from our garden says the smug gardener), cooking the chicken, making the sauce, which to be honest really made itself, I just poured stuff into the pan and let it bubble away.  I served it with basmati rice, mangetout and green beans.  The mangetout were quite stringy so I’ve thrown the rest of them in the compost but everything else was lovely.  The main difference between my attempt and Nigella’s is that she uses vermouth but I used wine.  Oh and I neglected to sear the chicken breasts so they looked a bit bland but trust me they tasted great!  The finished tarragon chicken

The sauce is made from scallions, tarragon, white wine, salt and double cream.  I thought it might be a little heavy but it wasn’t, just very flavoursome.  The aniseed type flavour of the tarragon matched so well with the wine.  This was a definite hit here and I will make it again.  But I will also continue to try out new recipes from the cookbook shelves!  Thanks Elizabeth for a great idea and bon appetit everyone!

 

Bits and Bobs · Books

A space of one’s own – soon to be a room

Like many other women I know, I have a place in our house where a lot of my work gets done. I’m not talking about housework or cooking, no rather the researching, reading, campaigning, blogging, organising, writing, tiny bit of crafting and big pinch of staring out of the window daydreaming that makes up my average working day.

My workplace – unsurprisingly – is my kitchen table. That will largely change at some point in the next few months when the office that my lovely husband is building for me is finished. He has done all of it by himself and is now at the point of roofing. I am getting rather excited by it now. But back to my kitchen table. Its nothing unusual or special, a maple (I think) table, 4ft by 2ft. Not terribly big but then neither is our kitchen.

This table is where we eat breakfast – which apart from weekends is a staggered affair, DH and DD have theirs at 6.45 and 7.20 respectively, and then I sit down to mine in perfect peace at 8.15 when they’ve gone. Its where DH and I generally sit with a cuppa when he gets in from work and chew over our day. Its where DD likes to play her toy piano – loudly. Its where we generally eat dinner, not always, And for me its where I spend a sizeable chunk of my weekdays.

I’m the first to admit I’m not the tidiest person in the world and while by and large I keep the house clean, it often resembles an explosion in a paper mill with wool, needles and pens thrown in for good measure. Most mornings my beloved husband has to move newspapers, books and notepads of mine before he can sit down with his breakfast. Is it any wonder he suggested I might like a dedicated office space?? Once everyone else has left for the day I generally give the kitchen a quick tidy up and going over and that includes ‘sorting’ out everything that has ‘somehow’ ended up on the table over the last 24 hours.

Our little girl has been off school the last couple of days with a bit of a dose so I’ve been largely confined to barracks and have spent a lot of that time curled up with her on a sofa. Today thankfully she seems to be on the mend and so I’m back at the table a bit. It occurred to me earlier that a glance at our kitchen table on any given day would give a good indication of what I’ve been up to or where my mind is. So here’s how it looks right now:
Kitchen table

What do we have? The laptop I’m writing this blog post on, the last two days newspapers, the ever present cuppa, my sewing box, my knitting bag, Roy Foster’s Vivid Faces, a notebook and my hairbrush. I think the presence of the latter is thanks to my daughter who likes to play with hairbrushes.  So, what do you deduce from that?  I finished knitting a wee hat earlier, I am a news junkie, some days I practically mainline tea, and I love history (and I’ve cooked up an interesting research project too but more about that another day).  Just an average day for me.  Other days there might be piles of posters to be distributed, or forms to be filled in but the basics would be much the same.

I am rather attached to my little workspace, even if I do have to clear it all off so we can have dinner.  But I’m REALLY looking forward to my new office where I can finally use the big desk (about 6ft by 3ft) that came out of a solicitor’s office in Liverpool many moons ago and has languished in our storage space for 12 years.  I can organise everything how I want it and I will know exactly what is in each pile and what I will do with.  I can finally get the two filing cabinets, two small desks, two printers and three bookshelves out of our daughter’s room and set up my work space to suit myself.  And you know the best bit of all?  I won’t have to clear it away at the end of the day!!!

Books

What I’ve been reading lately – April 2015

I love books as some of you will know, and I read a lot. There’s always at least two books of mine on the go in this house. A friend asked me recently if I’d read anything lately that I would recommend, so I suggested a few things I’d enjoyed and thought she might like. That got me thinking about how much I actually do read, I don’t know if there’s any kind of average of number of books read in a month but it made me sit and jot down what books I’d read most recently. And that naturally led to a blog post. Now this may or may not become a regular feature here but here’s the books I read in April and what I thought of them.

Women of the Irish RevolutionLiz Gillis Women of the Irish Revolution This is a photographic history of many of the women who  took part in various ways in the revolutionary period in Ireland, roughly from 1913-1923. Its a superb book, with so many photographs I have never seen before. Gillis explores each woman’s role and activities and also gives a synopsis of what they did afterwards, much of which I had no idea of. It is an easy to read, beautifully presented book which I would recommend as a good starting point for anyone interested in this period and most especially in women’s political and revolutionary activities.

Secret Diary of a Demented HousewifeNiamh Greene Secret Diary of a Demented Housewife I had never heard of Niamh Greene but saw this in a charity shop, fancied a light read and it was only a euro. Thankfully it was only a euro. I couldn’t finish it and it is very rare I can’t finish a book. Awful. I only managed 20 pages before I threw it in the bag for the charity shop. Poorly written, no likeable characters and after the 20 pages were up I realised I couldn’t care less what happened to the characters and that there was surely something else I could do with my time. I hate to be bitchy but that is my honest opinion of this book. Greene clearly has a market out there for her books, but I’m not part of it.

John Taylor In the Pleasure Groove: Love, Death and Duran Duran Ok, cards on the table. I LOVED Duran Duran asIn the Pleasure Groove  a teenager, my bedroom walls were covered in pictures of them. I lost interest in them around 1988 and the pictures all came down. I didn’t keep up to speed with what they were doing unless they were mentioned in some magazine or paper I was reading. Kept most of the vinyl though. So I wasn’t aware that John Taylor had written his autobiography until I saw it in a charity shop (there’s a recurring theme here with my reading). It gave me a bit of a trip down memory lane, and also brought me up to date on what the band had been doing. (I wasn’t sure if they were still together or not…..they are) Its a light enough read in most parts, and I got through it quickly. The section where JT (well I have to call him that really, we all did back in the 80’s) details his alcohol and drug addiction and his struggle to overcome them are, for me, the best and most moving part of the book. I enjoyed this far more than I really expected to if I’m honest. If I’d been reading this as a Duran-mad teenager I wouldn’t have appreciated it at all. But as a woman in her 40’s, I found this interesting, enjoyable, and surprisingly moving in parts. Taylor’s honesty about his relationship with his parents and then with his own child and what he calls his blended family takes this out of the realm of the bog standard pop biog.

Easter WidowsSinead McCoole Easter Widows The latest book from Sinead McCoole explores the lives of the seven women whose husbands were executed in May 1916 in the immediate aftermath of the Easter Rising. McCoole has an impressive list of works on women in the revolutionary period in Ireland and this book added hugely to my knowledge of that period. I knew the life stories of Maud Gonne, of Kathleen Clarke, of Muriel MacDonagh, I knew something of the story of Grace Gifford Plunkett, but I knew very little of Lillie Connolly, of Aine Ceannt or Agnes Mallin. This book took years to research and write and while reading it I got a real sense of how engrossed McCoole must have been in these women’s lives. I did find it a little unbalanced at times – I got a much clearer sense of some of the women than of others – but that may be due to the sources that were available. One issue that would have improved my enjoyment of the book is that I found it hard at times to keep track of the various people owing to McCoole’s use of their given names without a surname. Many of the lesser characters share given names with the women or their children and that got confusing at times when no surname was used. However, I found this an excellent read, very well written, and would highly recommend it. Some of the stories are simply heartbreaking and it is clear that some of these women suffered for the rest of their lives, financially, emotionally, physically. A very moving book.

Audrey Niffenegger The Time Traveler’s Wife I saw a wee bit of the film of this on TV about a year ago and thought Time Traveler's Wife the premise was curious. I still haven’t seen the film (but will see it tonight when its on RTE!) but on finding the book thought it was worth a look. And yes, this was another of my charity shop pick ups. I’m not going to outline the plot here, I’m sure there are others out there like me who eventually get around to reading the “latest best seller” a few years after it was published. Its a mix of science fiction and love story and for me it worked on both levels. Henry can travel back and forward through time – at least through his own life – and meets Clare at various stages of her life. They fall in love and marry. If you want to know if its a happy ever after you’ll have to read it for yourself, and DO, its a great book and I loved it. But I wouldn’t read it again (and I have many novels I return to over and again) because I know how it finishes, so the sense of wondering how the story will go wouldn’t be there for me. I’m wondering now if the film can be as good, I’m often disappointed by film adaptations, but we’ll see.

Divas Don't KnitFinally, I read Gil McNeil Divas Don’t Knit Well I’m not a diva (ok maybe I have diva-ish tendencies at times) but I do knit, not briliantly, but I do and I enjoy it. So this was another attempt at a light read. This time it worked, I enjoyed this a lot. Sometimes you (or me anyway) just want a book that’s not challenging, that has a story, that offers a bit of entertainment for an hour or two. Divas Don’t Knit did that for me. Its the story of Jo Mackenzie who after the death of her husband (who had just told her he was leaving her for another woman), moves to a different town with her two small sons, and takes over her grandmother’s wool shop. She sets up a knitting group and gets involved with various local and national characters, some likeable others less so but utterly believable all the same. The plot moved along quickly – maybe a little implausible at times – but it never dragged and it was easy to switch off for a while and just enjoy it. Worth looking at if you need a light easy read of a wet afternoon.

So there you go, that’s what I read in April. Six books. I’d probably usually read more in a month but it was Easter holidays for the part of the month so reading time was much curtailed! If you’ve any suggestions or recommendations of books for me to try, please do send them on, I’m always up for a reading challenge! If you’ve read any of these I’d be interested to hear what you thought of them. Happy Reading!!